Here are 5 Adventurous Moon Cakes to Try in China

By Ryan Gandolfo, September 23, 2020

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Moon cakes can easily be considered a culinary highlight in China. Boasting an eclectic history involving hidden messages and combat, these carb-heavy treats are used to celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival, with flavors like lotus paste, red bean paste and salted egg yolk generally reigning supreme. However, there is a new generation of moon cakes – with bold and bizarre flavors permeating the industry. 

Here are a few that caught our eyes and could make for a fun gift for your family, friends or, best of all, yourself.


Durian Moon Cakes

durian-moon-cakes.jpg
Image via Taobao

Whether you eat durian on the reg or can’t stand the pungent fruit, you should probably try a durian moon cake even if it’s just to say that you have. Like with most durian-infused products, these moon cakes won’t have the same fetid smell so widely acknowledged among people with functioning noses. But you can expect the taste to be comparable to your typical durian snack. However, don’t assume this treat will offer all – or any – of the health benefits associated with the fruit. After all, you’re eating cake.

Available on Taobao.

Crayfish Moon Cakes

TB2KyVIfE3IL1JjSZFMXXajrFXa_-828931843.jpg
Image via Taobao

Everyone loves a little xiaolongxia action, right? Well, you may not have known that these freshwater crustaceans also come in moon cake form. You can find these ‘small lobster’ cakes – not to be confused with the famous Boston crab cakes – on Taobao. So, if you have a pengyou who loves crayfish, show them how much you care this Mid-Autumn Festival with this unique moon cake set.

Available on Taobao.

Pokemon Moon Cakes

pokemon moon cakes.pngImage via Tmall

Try and catch ’em all this year with these epic Pokemon-themed moon cakes. With delightfully tacky Pokeball-shaped cakes, this is a great gift to any gamer living in China. The package comes with six moon cakes, including three flavors: chocolate with custard filling, matcha with red bean filling and Earl Grey Tea. Be the very best with these moon cakes.

Available on Tmall.

Oreo Moon Cakes

TB1dyKEawHqK1RjSZFEXXcGMXXa_-0-item_pic.jpg
Image via Taobao

This one you might well have seen, heard of or even tasted before. While Oreo has been dabbling in the moon cake game for a few years now, we keep expecting the quality to improve. Has it? Meh. But with flavors like cocoa cream, pineapple, strawberry and chocolate, they’re the perfect substitute for those looking to celebrate without giving the traditional cakes a go.

Available on Taobao.

Oatly Moon Cakes

oatly.jpgImage via Tmall

The company that created a Chinese word for ‘plant-based milk’ has moon cakes. Go figure! But seriously, their four-piece moon cake set is low-sugar, with flavors black sesame and mung bean joining the fraternity of celestial cakes. The treats come paired with the vegan company’s famous oat milk, so there’s a little extra in it for you.

Available on Tmall.

The article has been updated and republished on September 23, 2020.

[Cover image via Taobao]

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