Can Chinese Students Really Read 100,000 Words in 5 Minutes?

By Gary Bailer, October 21, 2019

0 0

Recently, the Chinese internet saw heated debate over ‘quantum speed-reading,’ a method touted by an education consulting firm in Lanzhou, Gansu province as enabling students to ‘finish reading a book in a minute,’ Southern Metropolis Daily reported on October 16. 

A video posted by the Guangzhou newspaper showed children using the reading method to skim through books by flipping quickly through pages (sometimes while blindfolded). Ms. Shi with the Lanzhou company told reporters via a phone interview that the theory behind ‘quantum speed-reading’ is to “develop children’s ability to resonate with the cosmos.” Shi said that if a child’s brain is strong enough, they can ‘see’ the scenes described in books unfolding in their mind as if they were watching a movie. A three-month speed-reading course costs RMB12,800, she added. 

magic.jpg
Screengrab via Southern Metropolis Daily

A video posted on October 14 showed a roomful of students leafing through books, while being overseen by staff members during a speed-reading competition organized by a school branch of Beijing Xinzhitong Qiguang Education, a ‘brain training’ center, according to Beijing Time. According to China Daily, the speed-reading competition was held at a branch school of Beijing Xinzhitong in Yancheng, Jiangsu province. 

An organization poster claimed their courses, which are aimed at the 10-16 age group, featured ‘quantum speed-reading’ that could help their trainees to finish a 100,000-word book in one to five minutes. 

Watch ‘quantum speed-reading’ below (VPN off):

A teacher, surnamed Ai, with the Beijing brain training center denied any involvement in the speed-reading course in question, telling Beijing Time in a phone interview that the course and the controversial poster were not produced by their parent company, but purchased by the branch school from an unknown source. Ai added that her company only offered standard speed-reading and shorthand training courses that were invented by a Japanese expert. 

Xiong Bingqi, an education scholar with Chinese NGO 21st Century Education Study Institute, said in an interview that the so-called ‘quantum speed-reading’ had no scientific grounds as it went against common sense in the field of education and that these training centers were playing on Chinese parents’ anxiety to give their children the edge over their peers, according to Southern Metropolis Daily

READ MORE: Chinese Students Use Bizarre Hand Technique at Math Competition

[Cover image via Pexels

more news

Chinese Netizens React to Kanye West Running for US President

Kanye West recently announced via Twitter that he is officially running for the highest office in the land – and the internet proceeded to lose its mind.

Beyond Meat Expands to Chinese Grocery Stores

Beyond Meat announces cooperation with Alibaba's Hema supermarkets to sell its meatless burger patties in the China market.

Chinese Airline Flight Suspended After 6 COVID-19 Cases Onboard

The suspension of the flight route is in reference to the 'circuit breaker' policy.

Stephon Marbury, From NBA All-Star to Chinese Basketball Legend

Stephon Marbury has lived his best life in China, moving to the Middle Kingdom in 2010 to play in the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA).

Chinese Submersible Visits Challenger Deep, the Ocean's Deepest Point

The submersible collected samples and snapped some high-def photos of little-explored Challenger Deep.

US Designates 4 More Chinese Media Outlets as 'Foreign Missions'

Four more Chinese media organizations that operate in the US have been designated as foreign missions by the Trump administration.

The Incredible Life of Isabel Crook, Chinese Medal of Friendship Recipient

Born in Chengdu, Sichuan in December of 1915, Isabel witnessed some of the biggest events of the 20th century through a Chinese lens.

0 User Comments

In Case You Missed It…

We're on WeChat!

Scan our QR Code at right or follow us at thatsonline for events, guides, giveaways and much more!

7 Days in China With thatsmags.com

Weekly updates to your email inbox every Wednesday

Subscribe

Download previous issues

Never miss an issue of That's Magazines!

Visit the archives

Get the App. Your essential China city companion.