This 200-year-old Sake Brand Is Coming to China, so We Tried It

By That's GBA, August 20, 2020

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Sake has become increasingly prevalent in China, as many young consumers have shown a tendency to pick the rice-based alcohol over baijiu, the PRC’s heavy-hitting liquor. 

While baijiu ranges from around 30-60% alcohol by volume, sake doesn’t surpass 20% – making it a mild, less menacing option with a meal while out with mates.

Sake sellers have gravitated to China in recent years, with the PRC reportedly the fastest growing market for sake exports in 2018, according to Kyodo News.

This year, Kansai-based Daimon joined the fray by entering the China market, so we decided to give their Daimon 55 Junmai Ginjo a try. 

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At 720 millimeters, Daimon 55 is simply a taste of Osaka in a cup, with a light aroma that pairs well with fish dishes and other light meals.

The Daimon series uses fresh mountain water and the top-notch Hyogo Yamada Nishiki rice to create a great flavor, aroma, style and substance. 

Overall, we find the sake well balanced and smooth. 

The brand has a history that dates back to 1826, boasting six generations of brewing history and a solid reputation among the sake-slamming community.

Daimon.jpegDaimon brewery

The established sake brand is sure to benefit from a market that has over 40,000 Japanese restaurants – making China the country with the most Japanese restaurants abroad, according to the Japan External Trade Organization.

[Images via Daimon]

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